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Tag Archive 'free legal research'

Court Listener, founded in 2010 by Brian W. Carver and Michael Lissner, is a free legal research platform – an alternative to fee-based research databases. This project is sponsored by the Non-Profit Free Law Project and offers coverage of millions of legal opinions from federal and state courts, and most recently even oral arguments from […]

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Via In Custodia Legis, the Library of Congress announced that through an agreement with William S. Hein & Co., it will now offer free online access to historical U.S. legal materials, which include the following: United States Code 1925-1988 (includes content up to 1993) From Guide to Law Online: United States Law United States Reports v. 1-542 (1754-2004) […]

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Constitute was developed by the Comparative Constitutions Project with the help of National Science Foundation (SES 0648288, IIS 1018554), the Cline Center for Democracy, the University of Texas, the University of Chicago, and the Constitution Unit at University College London. Currently Constitute includes the constitution that was in force in September of 2013 for nearly every independent state in the world. Certain countries whose constitutional […]

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Via beSpecific, a new Australasian Colonial Legal History Library launched online. This Library includes databases of Australasian legal history accessible via AustLII. Catalog and Websearch enables browsing of Australasian legal history related materials on other websites as does Law on Google. Databases are divided into New South Wales, Queensland, South Australia, Tasmania, Victoria, Western Australia, New Zealand, and Law Journals and Legal Scholarship. Further, researchers […]

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As mentioned in our previous blog(s), Google Scholar continues to update its search and interface. So, here is the latest. Via the official Google Scholar Blog, the two most recent changes include a “more modern look” (as referred to it by Google) and ability to sort by most recent additions. With respect to the “more […]

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We have written about Google Scholar and legal opinions in the past, but it is time for an update. Google has recently announced changes to its Google Scholar display of legal citations. Via Google Scholar Blog post titled Finding Significant Citations for Legal Opinions, Google has significantly changed the way it displays citations for legal opinions. […]

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Justia.com launched a free service providing Daily & Weekly Opinion Summaries for all Federal Courts, and selected State Supreme Courts.  The daily summaries are also available by practice area.  To receive the summaries, users need to register with Justia.com, unless they already have an account.  See the following examples of daily email for the U.S. 9th […]

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Authors of 3 Geeks and a Law Blog has assembled an interactive map of the United States displaying what free legal research product is offered by bar associations of individual states. Check it out here.

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OpenJurist

OpenJurist is a new collaborative initiative to provide a resource for access to the case law of the United States. Our organization believes that because the laws of the land are in the public domain, they should be accessible by the public without restriction and especially without charge. Our collection includes approximately 647,000 opinions and […]

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We already blogged about the Google Scholar newest edition – the ability to search for legal decisions and related legal materials, such are legal periodicals. LLRX.com added a review of the Google Scholar: A New Way to Search for Cases and Related Legal Publications, by Courtney Minick and David Tsai. Check it out!

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