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Tag Archive 'legal research'

Legislative history research can be a difficult process, but finding historical information on federal rules and regulations can stump even experienced researchers. In Custodia Legis, the blog of the Law Library of Congress, recently published a guide, “How to Trace Federal Regulations,” that describes methods of researching administrative regulations and their history. Administrative rules and […]

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Court Listener, founded in 2010 by Brian W. Carver and Michael Lissner, is a free legal research platform – an alternative to fee-based research databases. This project is sponsored by the Non-Profit Free Law Project and offers coverage of millions of legal opinions from federal and state courts, and most recently even oral arguments from […]

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Check this article from the ABA Journal “Ten Tips for Better Legal Writing” to help you produce better legal papers through research, understanding, and proofreading.

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Researching Human Trafficking? There are two great case law databases publicly available online. Human Trafficking Law Project (HTLP) Database, launched in February 2011 by the Human Trafficking Clinic at Michigan Law School, is a publicly available database of human trafficking cases within the United States. The database is fully searchable even though it does not […]

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POST WRITTEN BY: Lauren Baron (’15), Pace Law School Attorneys involved in environmental issues related to energy and water within New York State will find the resources of the Public Service Commission helpful in order to advise policy makers or clients on a course of action. The New York Public Service Commission (PSC) is the […]

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To follow up on our 2013 post about Congress.gov, here are some of the latest improvements. In Custodia Legis Blog by the Library of Congress recently posted information on advanced search and browse functionalities and appropriations tables added to the website. Check out the Advanced Search, Browse, and Appropriations Tables Added to Congress.gov post.

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Constitute was developed by the Comparative Constitutions Project with the help of National Science Foundation (SES 0648288, IIS 1018554), the Cline Center for Democracy, the University of Texas, the University of Chicago, and the Constitution Unit at University College London. Currently Constitute includes the constitution that was in force in September of 2013 for nearly every independent state in the world. Certain countries whose constitutional […]

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Via the LLRX.com, the following are the newest additions: Mass Incarceration and the “Degree of Civilization” - By Ken Strutin [The author] states that incarceration is when a person loses their freedom pending trial or by serving a sentence – and mass incarceration is when millions of people are imprisoned and kept there based on a […]

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LLRX.com, Law and Technology Resources for Legal Professionals, is an excellent source of new or updated information about the law and technology. Those that are interested may subscribe to updates via RSS feed. The following are some of the new additions and updates:

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As mentioned in our previous blog(s), Google Scholar continues to update its search and interface. So, here is the latest. Via the official Google Scholar Blog, the two most recent changes include a “more modern look” (as referred to it by Google) and ability to sort by most recent additions. With respect to the “more […]

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