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Tag Archive 'legal research'

The 20th edition of the Bluebook was recently released. The numbering of the rules in the Bluepages (non-academic citation) now parallels the numbering in the Whitepages (academic citation). Typeface rules were relaxed to permit use of large and small caps in court documents for stylistic purposes. Rule 14 includes more examples of citations for a […]

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Information on summer access to Lexis, Bloomberg Law, and Westlaw for students who are NOT graduating in May: Lexis has no restrictions on use over the summer, and you do not have to do anything to extend your password. Bloomberg Law has no restrictions on use over the summer, and you do not have to do anything […]

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To follow up on our May 2013 post written by Cynthia Pittson, Monica Berger of New York City College of Technology at CUNY, and Jill Cirasella, of Graduate Center also at CUNY, in their Beyond Beall’s List: Better Understanding Predatory Publishers offer an updated overview of what predatory open access (OA) journals are, how to recognize […]

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Pace University libraries have adopted a Discovery Service that searches not only the Library catalog, but many full-text interdisciplinary subscription databases. Rather than search the catalog and then relevant databases separately, you can search all of these resources at once. This includes HeinOnline, Academic Search Complete, Environment Complete, JSTOR, Business Search Premier, and many more. […]

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Legislative history research can be a difficult process, but finding historical information on federal rules and regulations can stump even experienced researchers. In Custodia Legis, the blog of the Law Library of Congress, recently published a guide, “How to Trace Federal Regulations,” that describes methods of researching administrative regulations and their history. Administrative rules and […]

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Court Listener, founded in 2010 by Brian W. Carver and Michael Lissner, is a free legal research platform – an alternative to fee-based research databases. This project is sponsored by the Non-Profit Free Law Project and offers coverage of millions of legal opinions from federal and state courts, and most recently even oral arguments from […]

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Check this article from the ABA Journal “Ten Tips for Better Legal Writing” to help you produce better legal papers through research, understanding, and proofreading.

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Researching Human Trafficking? There are two great case law databases publicly available online. Human Trafficking Law Project (HTLP) Database, launched in February 2011 by the Human Trafficking Clinic at Michigan Law School, is a publicly available database of human trafficking cases within the United States. The database is fully searchable even though it does not […]

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POST WRITTEN BY: Lauren Baron (’15), Pace Law School Attorneys involved in environmental issues related to energy and water within New York State will find the resources of the Public Service Commission helpful in order to advise policy makers or clients on a course of action. The New York Public Service Commission (PSC) is the […]

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To follow up on our 2013 post about Congress.gov, here are some of the latest improvements. In Custodia Legis Blog by the Library of Congress recently posted information on advanced search and browse functionalities and appropriations tables added to the website. Check out the Advanced Search, Browse, and Appropriations Tables Added to Congress.gov post.

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